Design process at GROHE

GROHE Ondus Veris

GROHE products and services should surprise and delight their users throughout their long service lives.

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People

Good design is about understanding people. It translates a user’s requirements, desires and expectations into a product or service that they love to use. At GROHE, all design activity begins with the question: What do people need?

To answer this, we gather information from a plethora of sources ranging from consumer focus groups to the utilisation of advanced observation techniques. This knowledge allows us to ascertain both the articulated and unarticulated needs of our customers and is the starting point of a structured design process.
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Trend analysis

We invest a substantial amount of time tracking, identifying and exploring trends. Our in-house design team frequents the most influential global fairs, exhibitions and events across all fields of design, interiors and architecture. This research enables our designers to stay abreast of current lifestyle trends and identify emerging ones.

Ongoing observation, analysis and exploration of cultural references and their sources, allow us to predict future trends in consumer behaviour.
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Concept development

From the outset, ‘creative workshops’ allow the design team to cross-filter ideas – transforming good concepts into great concepts. Ideas are documented and communicated within the group through sketches and model making. This platform for collaborative visualisation and discussion allow ideas to evolve and develop, before channelling them into the desired direction.

Design critiques are held at key stages throughout the duration of each project. During a series of collective discussions, strengths and weaknesses are assessed and potential improvements identified. This objective process ensure design remains relevant.
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Evaluation

Design critiques are held at key stages throughout the duration of each project. During a series of collective discussions, strengths and weaknesses are assessed and potential improvements identified. This objective process ensure design remains relevant.
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3D Modeling

Virtual models are created using advanced computer programs and introduce the working components of a product to the design at an early stage. These bring an element of realism to the concept, improve the design quality and reduce product development cycles. These complex virtual surfaces can then be used to create high-quality renderings or directly transferred to our in-house rapid-prototyping facilities, to create tangible models.
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Model making

The design concept is best evaluated in the form of a life-size model. This enables the ergonomics of the design and the quality of the surfaces to be accurately assessed.

Two types of model are generated. The preliminary ‘soft’ model – often constructed from dense sculpting foam – is used for fast evaluation of basic sizes and proportions. At this stage, the design is reshaped and refined by hand to explore and improve its tactile quality. The later ‘hard’ model has the appearance and accuracy of a finished product and is used for a final evaluation before a working prototype is produced.
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Product

The final stage of the process culminates in a product that functions to perfection and is both aesthetically and ergonomically pleasing. Delivering the perfect balance of technology, quality and design.